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UPEI professors receive special honour

UPEI professors Lisa Chilton and Robert Dennis have been named associates for the L.R. Wilson Institute for Canadian History.
The honour recognizes scholars who push the field of Canadian history in exciting new directions.
UPEI professors Lisa Chilton and Robert Dennis have been named associates for the L.R. Wilson Institute for Canadian History.
The honour recognizes scholars who push the field of Canadian history in exciting new directions. - Submitted

Chilton, Dennis named associates for L.R. Wilson Institute for Canadian History

CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. – University of Prince Edward Island professors Lisa Chilton and Robert Dennis have been recognized for their work in the field of Canadian history.

The L.R. Wilson Institute for Canadian History has announced its first-ever list of associates for 2017–2020, made up of 37 scholars from Canada and the United States who, according to the institute’s website, are “pushing the field of Canadian history in exciting new transnational directions…asking new questions and bringing new perspectives to the writing of Canadian history.”

The institute’s goal for its associates program is to build a diverse network of scholars inside and outside of Canada, and to support the work of both anglophone and francophone scholars from a variety of institutions and at different stages in their careers.

Robert Gilmour, vice-president academic and research at UPEI, said the university is delighted Chilton and Dennis, two of its leading scholars, have been recognized by the institute.

“(They) have impressive records as innovators, not only with respect to their research, but also as communicators of their work to the scholarly community and to their students.”

Chilton is an associate professor of history, a member of the graduate faculty of the master of arts in island studies and the director of a new program in applied communication, leadership and culture at UPEI. Her areas of research and publishing expertise are the history of international migrations and the history of British cultural imperialism, especially as they relate to pre-Second World War Canada. Her publications include “Agents of Empire: British Female Migration to Canada and Australia, 1860s-1930” (University of Toronto Press, 2007), as well as articles and chapters in multiple journals and edited collections. She is currently writing a book on the history of Canadian immigration from the 1760s to the Great Depression.

Dennis is an assistant professor of religious studies and an intellectual and religious historian with a specialization in Roman Catholicism. He is currently writing a history of Saint Dunstan’s University from 1955 to 1969. He has recently completed a manuscript on how transatlantic developments in Catholic social thought influenced the formation of social Catholicism in English Canada during the Depression and Second World War years.

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