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Group of P.E.I. craftswomen sharing threads of hope

Quilters Diane Williams, left, Edith Hogan, Elaine Burrows and Judy LaMarsh are shown with one of their creations.
Quilters Diane Williams, left, Edith Hogan, Elaine Burrows and Judy LaMarsh are shown with one of their creations. - Desiree Anstey

Green’s Shore Quilters spread their warmth around the world to those in need as they sew comfort and warmth into every patch


SUMMERSIDE, P.E.I. – Colourful homemade quilts, ranging from baby- to king-sized, drape across a table and onto the floor.

The sewers, a close-knit group of women who form the Green’s Shore Quilters from Summerside, waste no piece of fabric.

They know all too well the value of each block and the satisfaction of creating something that will benefit those in need.

“We branch from the Canadian Quilting Group,” said one of the co-ordinators, Edith Hogan.

The group, comprised of 28 members, has donated its quilts to several charitable organizations, including Ronald MacDonald House in St. John’s and Days for Girls, which provides feminine hygiene kits to girls in Kenya.

Countless lives have been impacted through their generosity.

From teenagers suffering with drug addiction, to youth in foster homes, to patients battling cancer, the homemade patchwork quilts bring colour and comfort to many who may feel alone in the dark.

Edith Hogan and her sisters made a family tree quilt for a Gaudet family reunion. The quilt contains the names of their ancestors, their grandparents’ farmhouse in the background, and a treasured black and white photo of them.
Edith Hogan and her sisters made a family tree quilt for a Gaudet family reunion. The quilt contains the names of their ancestors, their grandparents’ farmhouse in the background, and a treasured black and white photo of them.

“It’s a way to give back to the community,” said member Judy LaMarsh.

The demand for their quilts across P.E.I. has steadily grown.

“I just delivered a lap quilt to a cancer patient,” said Hogan. “You hate to see anyone who has to get one. We would like to go out of business, but this is the reality. It was especially nice because her husband was there to support her.”

Green’s Shore Quilters work with Victoria’s Quilts Canada, a Tignish branch that’s part of a national organization making quilts to comfort people with cancer.

“In the last year we have given 21 tops (the top part of the quilt) to this branch. They will then sandwich the quilt together before donating it to a cancer patient.

“The reaction I often get is, ‘you don’t know me and yet you made me a quilt.’ They are very touched, and you do feel connected,” said Hogan.

Many members of the Green’s Shore Quilters said that they enjoy the fellowship and social outing they get from being a part of the group.

“I moved to P.E.I. from New Brunswick and joined the group to make new friends with the same interests,” said member Diane Williams.

Elaine Burrows agreed with Williams, adding, “I’ve been with the group since 2009. I joined for the camaraderie, doing something that I love, and giving back to the community.”

Members typically meet on Thursdays at the St. Eleanors Community Centre in Summerside, from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Aside from the regular Thursday meetings, members enjoy retreats and workshops throughout the year.

The next Green’s Shore Show and Tell meeting will be held at St. Eleanors Community Centre on Thursday, Feb. 15.

Newsroom@jouralpioneer.com.

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