Top News

Baha’i 200th anniversary celebrated in Charlottetown

Saeed Foroughi and Lana Donnelly Quinn perform at the Unity of Humanity Festival. SUBMITTED PHOTO
Saeed Foroughi and Lana Donnelly Quinn perform at the Unity of Humanity Festival. SUBMITTED PHOTO

More than 200 people recently attended the Unity of Humanity Festival marking the 200th anniversary of the birth of Bahá’u’lláh, founder of the Baha’i faith, at the Florence Simmons Performance Hall.

The program introduced the audience to the founder of the Bahá’í faith, Bahá’u’lláh, through music selections woven together with dramatic sketches.

Unity of humanity is the central teaching of the Bahá’í faith. The basic conditions to achieving unity include the equality of women and men, the abolition of extremes of poverty and wealth, and a perception of the human race and the world as a single community, stated a release from the Charlottetown Baha’i community.

  1. performances began with actor Bill McFadden in the role of puppet master relating a story about performing a puppet show and meeting Bahá’u’lláh as a young boy. The narrative continued with a reading performed by Nick Chandler, and a story told by Sara Ashenai. Local writer Paul Vreeland acted the role of British professor Edward Granville Brown, telling of his meeting with Bahá’u’lláh in his later years. Vreeland read from a written account of this meeting left by Brown.

Musical performances included Lana Donnelly Quinn and Saeed Foroughi performing together on santour and harp. Erik Petersen played a composition of his own, “King of Glory”, on guitar. Jasmine Michel played sonata nr. 1 for violin solo by Niels Otto Raasted (1888-1966) and sang her own composition, “The Light of Unity is Dawning”.

The music and storytelling combined with the set up of the Florence Simmons hall created a sense of intimacy in the 308-seat theatre, said community member Patrick O'Neill.

 

Recent Stories