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Recent comments

  • Sarah
    August 13, 2014 - 14:54

    Thanks so much for this editorial. A group of my friends and family members swam at lakeside beach having lots of fun in the big waves. No one else was swimming and we couldn't figure out why. Later on that evening we found out from a local that it was dangerous to be in the water as there was a high risk of rip currents! Not being from around here we didn't have a clue. Not a sign, nothing! To think anyone of us could have easily met the same fate as that poor woman. Someone needs to be held accountable for not informing the public of such dangers.

  • Bottom Line
    August 13, 2014 - 07:46

    The bottom line is there will always be people who disregard the warnings no matter how prevalent they are. Have you ever seen a pack of cigarettes? People still smoke. Spending hundreds of thousands of dollars more is not going to keep the foolish out of the water.

    • Sarah
      August 13, 2014 - 14:56

      Thanks so much for this editorial. A group of my friends and family members swam at lakeside beach having lots of fun in the big waves. No one else was swimming and we couldn't figure out why. Later on that evening we found out from a local that it was dangerous to be in the water as there was a high risk of rip currents! Not being from around here we didn't have a clue. Not a sign, nothing! To think anyone of us could have easily met the same fate as that poor woman. Someone needs to be held accountable for not informing the public of such dangers.

  • Joanne E. MacRae
    August 12, 2014 - 19:47

    This is one of the best written editorials that I've read in the Guardian. You identified the problem of senseless drownings and you offered possible solutions so drownings can be avoided. The ownership is on the community to implement your recommendations. I'd like to see Cdn. Red Cross Water Safety Division respond. I'd also like to see a PEI government department respond since Water Safety doesn't seem to get the funding or publicity that it used to receive twenty years ago.

  • nitpicker
    August 12, 2014 - 16:43

    Some years ago we'd be lamenting the fact that we had no way of quickly communicating danger to the masses. Today, with social media, twitter, the internet, mobile devices, we can communicate more quickly than ever before. Yet tragedy like this still happens. Put up boards?? Signage? We're an Island. We're surrounded by water. That means there are countless access points to the water. Bottom line, this editorial is a nice ideal, but there is no solution. Accidents will always happen.

  • W. Leach
    August 12, 2014 - 13:29

    An extra safe swim area on various beaches for optional use would help. Cables anchored to concrete blocks with floating surface lines on buoys, and with a few platforms (i.e at corners and maybe one mid length. Why not have permanent boards (electronic or otherwise) at all beaches with some signage and a life ring and some rope also?

    • LA
      August 12, 2014 - 22:45

      The entire circumference of the province is a potential beach. People don't just drown in government parks, the only place this might be financially feasible, and they already have more than sufficient warning systems in place. The APB-style warnings to tourist accommodations seem to be the only real way to warn (not necessarily stop, but warn) tourists of the dangers, although no system will ever be perfect. Nitpicker is right on this one. There's only so much you can do.