P.E.I.’s health card get a new look, now bilingual

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Stephen DesRoches photographed the Darnley shoreline that is now on the front of Prince Edward Island’s new bilingual health card. Islanders with expired health cards will receive the new card in the mail, phasing out the orange health card over the next five years.

P.E.I.’s health card is getting a new look.

The red cliff sandstone of Darnley shoreline is replacing the idyllic Panmure Island lighthouse currently featured on the card.

The new health cards are being rolled out this week.

Health Minister Robert Henderson says there has not been a significant update of the card since it was introduced in 1995.

“The new health card is bilingual and can hold more information for the benefit of the patient and the health care provider,” said Henderson.

“The new bilingual card has a clean, vibrant design that prominently features the stunning Darnley shoreline photographed by Stephen DesRoches of Prince Edward Island.”

Islanders preferred language will be featured on the front of the card at some point in the near future.

There will be space on the back of the card to include a red heart, which shows the owner’s intention to be an organ and tissue donor.

The red heart replaces the red sticker now being used.

It is expected the old health card will be phased out over the next five years as the existing cards expire.

The province says it carried out the design work in house, so there is no additional costs to revamp the card.

“The language profile of our province is changing with the promotion of Canada’s two official languages and a steady rise in immigration,” said Mark Kickham, Health P.E.I.’s manager of Medicare services.

“By adding the preferred language for service, staff will be better equipped to serve Islanders whose first language is not English, and ensure all Islanders get information in a clear and equitable manner.”

 

 

Online: www.healthpei.ca/healthcard

 

 

 

 

 

Organizations: Medicare

Geographic location: Prince Edward Island, Canada

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Comments

Comments

Recent comments

  • PeiGuytoo
    February 05, 2016 - 01:50

    That's a stunning photo, Stephen ... PEI at its best. I'm proud to carry it in my wallet!

  • Amigo
    February 04, 2016 - 05:59

    More political pandering, - more useless waste and misplaces political correctness. Give us better health care and shorter waiting time. Never mind trying pretending you are doing something useful, Mr. Premier.

  • PeiGuytoo
    February 04, 2016 - 02:38

    Time to close down these running comments ... they are absurdly tiresome and endlessly negative. Please, no more.

    • charlie brown
      February 04, 2016 - 13:44

      Yours more then most!

  • Cromwell
    February 03, 2016 - 21:13

    Currently on PEI, we have less than 3% of the population who speak French, of which 95% bspeak English, while, thanks to an insane immigration policy, more than 10% sp0eak either Mandarin/Cantonese or an Arabic language language. So waste public funds on providing a bilingual (English/French) health card. The abject nonsense of 'By adding the preferred language for service, staff will be better equipped to serve Islanders whose first language is not English, and ensure all Islanders get information in a clear and equitable manner.' is clearly PC BS, since none of the 'newcomers' are being schooled in French - as a preference, they are all receiving 'English as a Second Language'. I do not know who is pushing this abject stupidity, but please, cease and desist with the 'PEI is a bilingual province' garbage, since it clearly is not. On PEI, French, as a language, ceased to be of any significance in 1710.

  • KJM
    February 03, 2016 - 19:06

    What is it going to cost when other groups demand services in their own language, as is their right? In Charlottetown the 2 languages I hear the most are English and Mandarin. I know plenty of French people through work, youth sports etc. and they can all function quite well in English. This is a province where over 80% of the population considers English their first language and the private sector is pretty much all English. Spending all this money on duel languagr services that are, in my opinion, offered in the name of political correctness, is both ridiculous and irresponsible.

  • Jimmy Buffet
    February 03, 2016 - 17:49

    Disgusting waste of tax dollars . Sounds like people with nothing to do and trying to look busy to keep their job . I see room for cuts here and in tourism . It is long overdue time to cut back on the frills !

  • john
    February 03, 2016 - 16:43

    Perhaps the editor should take another look at the title of this piece.

    • james b
      February 03, 2016 - 19:45

      You are right I see it as well

  • up easterner
    February 03, 2016 - 13:56

    And the wasteful spending of our tax dollars continue!! Not a Doctor in the house and we are worried over bilingual health cards!!! Send these clowns home and bring in what we really need ,"front line staff " DOCTORS AND NURSES!!!

  • Steven Mulcair
    February 03, 2016 - 13:10

    This image is all wrong should be a picture of the senate and Mike Duffy. After all anyone who knows anything knows that it was the sage wisdom of the person who denied Mr. Duffy an Island health care card that saved our country from Harper. Thank-You for your work.

  • JL
    February 03, 2016 - 13:09

    Will it be seamless with the health systems in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia (ie. ONE MARITIME HEALTH SYSTEM) ? I can't get a family doctor in PEI (been on waiting list for 7 years now) so I'm going to get one in Nova Scotia where there are openings. I intend to use my PEI health card and have him bill PEI for my health care services which I as a citizen am entitled to. Robert Henderson can go shove it.

  • Oliver
    February 03, 2016 - 12:07

    So we are now 'embracing' (maybe we should CELERBRATE) the expense of providing dual health services in two l are we? pandering and silly notions pushed by the bureaucrats and politicians, --- and imagine, they forgot to ask the taxpayers. I don't know how, in this day and age of everybody having a right, we can neglect Mandarin and Arabic? You better be inclusive Mr. Henderson.

  • User
    February 03, 2016 - 11:58

    So are we to understand that if you say French on your health card you are assured total care in your 'preferred' language?? If not, it does not seem proper to raise expectations that thus will be the case. I thought our health care was I dire straights financially, and still one gets the impression that everything is provided in English and French. Imagine, ---- such trash, with large numbers of people you can't even find a doctor to begin with.

  • Lucas Hood
    February 03, 2016 - 11:09

    How about over hauling outpatient services instead of the card, 5 people in the waiting room at midnight and still 4 hour wait for a 10 min visit with the doctor. What a disgrace!

  • Sammy
    February 03, 2016 - 11:01

    The language profile of our province is changing with the promotion of Canada’s two official languages and a steady rise in immigration,” said Mark Kickham, Health P.E.I.’s manager I would like to know how many french immigrated last year to justify this. Perhaps we should be using Mandrin or Arabic because that is the way we are headed. Definitely not french.