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EDITORIAL: Cheers & Jeers June 22

Workers install a tower during construction of the Labrador-Island link.
Workers install a tower during construction of the Labrador-Island link. - Contributed

Cheers: to being trolled by consultants. As the software testing and operational woes continue on the Labrador-Island Link (LIL), the power line that’s supposed to bring Muskrat Falls power to market, there’s this happy line in a review document for the Public Utilities Board from Liberty Consultants about the lack of success so far: “Following successful dynamic commissioning at 225MW, a trial operation period will follow, during which the LIL must operate continuously without a trip for a minimum of 30 days. The LIL operated continuously at 225MW for three days in 2018, when in monopole mode.” Could you say, “Given its past record, we don’t think the chances are good” any more dryly if you tried?

Jeers: to maximum Max, and then some. Not to Max himself — Max was just one of the people to put a video question to the candidates for the leadership of federal Conservative Party of Canada during the leadership debate on Thursday night. But something about Max’s name seems to have caused a cerebral short-circuit, with virtually everyone following candidate Leslyn Lewis’s lead and dropping young Max’s name into every sentence of their answers, sometimes multiple times. “Thank you, Max, I must say, Max, I really value this question, Max…” By the end of that section of the debate, we were literally Maxxed out.

Jeers: to a global pandemic taking lives you would have loved to know more about. This, from the Toronto Star, about the life of Gene Goldman, 88, “who was thrown from a moving truck the night of his high school prom and into a sea of electric jellyfish and survived. ‘It took an entire global pandemic to kill him,’ his son Michael Goldman said in his obituary.” That’s just one of the many voices that you won’t get to sit down and listen to anymore. And we are, without a doubt, all the poorer for that.

Cheers: to insightful and worrying questions about life, the universe and everything. If you click on a digital headline like the Globe and Mail’s June 8, “How to escape the ‘sexual relationship death spiral’”, have you already admitted far too much about your own life? And what kind of advertising is Google likely to start throwing onto the edges of absolutely everything you read? (And why, says the person writing Cheers & Jeers this week, do I keep getting endless internet advertising for “Alaskan jigs,” a kind of mechanical frame that lets you turn your chainsaw into a lumber mill for cutting logs into rough lumber, and discount tourist flights to Bulgaria?) Maybe we should all stick with the next story in the Globe and Mail queue instead, “Five dietary mistakes making you gain weight in the pandemic.” And have a sandwich while we’re at it.

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