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LETTER: Prof. Denny's lobster livelihood plan a welcome idea

Shelley Denny is a Mi’kmaw doctoral candidate in the Interdisciplinary Program at Dalhousie University. The focus of her research is to use Two-Eyed Seeing to develop an alternative fisheries governance model for Mi’kmaw inherent and treaty fisheries in Nova Scotia. Two-Eyed Seeing is the concept that uses the strengths of Western and Indigenous ways of knowing for the benefit of all.
Shelley Denny is a Mi’kmaw doctoral candidate in the Interdisciplinary Program at Dalhousie University. The focus of her research is to use Two-Eyed Seeing to develop an alternative fisheries governance model for Mi’kmaw inherent and treaty fisheries in Nova Scotia. Two-Eyed Seeing is the concept that uses the strengths of Western and Indigenous ways of knowing for the benefit of all. - Contributed

I read Shelley Denny’s guest opinion (Making room for Mi’ kmaw livelihood fishery easier than you think: Giving up a small number of traps in return for building better relations, avoiding conflict and abiding by the law, Oct. 21) This article “idea” is like a light in a dark room. Anyone who has any knowledge of the Atlantic fisheries — and it’s certainly been in the news for all the wrong reasons — should be welcoming this idea. I would like to challenge all those commercial fishers to a least meet and discuss this idea.

Would it not be a blessing if this idea of trading a few traps for peace of mind be the solution to this issue?


Lovelyn Allen,
Charlottetown


 

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