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LETTER: Embarrassed again

Customers leave Dixie Lee in downtown Summerside on Thursday afternoon. The fried chicken franchise is owned by Mayor Basil Stewart and his son, Major Stewart.
Customers leave Dixie Lee in downtown Summerside last month. The fried chicken franchise is owned by Mayor Basil Stewart and his son, Major Stewart. - Bradley Works

When the news broke about a business co-owned by Mayor Stewart was in excess of $40,000 in arrears to the City of Summerside for the electricity that this business has been consuming left me shocked. I was shocked because how can a business be allowed to operate when it has such a huge outstanding balance for electricity usage, for I believe close to 30 months?

According to information available on the city website and from conversations I’ve had with former municipal employees, I believe the general rules around being in arrears to the city goes something like this: if you’re 60 days in arrears you’ll get a letter from the city, at 90 days you’ll get another letter (more sternly worded) a phone call and maybe even a visit from someone from the department warning you’ll be disconnected. The odds of a business being in arrears and still receiving electricity at the end of 120 days are very, very low. I believe no business has ever continued to be supplied with electricity for 30 months and being in arrears all that time except one co-owned by Mayor Stewart.

I’m asking those who are supposed to be in charge at City Hall, whether it’s the CAO, CFO or those in charge of accounts, please do the job you were hired for and shut down this business that continues to make a mockery of city rules and bylaws. 


John E. Clow,
Summerside

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