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LETTERS: Banning exports protects P.E.I. water

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(With World Water Day being celebrated today, March 22,) I am heartened to see that the draft Water Act released last week would make it illegal to export bottled water from P.E.I.

The supply of fresh water around the world is disappearing and many parts of the world already face severe water shortages. Exporting P.E.I.’s precious fresh water is indeed a mistake.

Watersheds across Canada are under threat from this practice.  Fortunately, the popularity of bottled water has decreased significantly in the past few years. According to Statistics Canada, in 2013, 23 per cent of households drank bottled water as their main source of drinking water compared to 30 per cent of households in 2007. People are realizing that it requires 3-5 litres of water to create a plastic, litre-sized bottle and that the manufacture and transport of bottled water requires a great deal of fossil fuel. 

They are recognizing that some bottled water actually consists of municipal water, including at least one brand on P.E.I.  They are concerned about the serious problems caused by discarded plastic bottles. And they are learning that while municipal water is tested at least daily for safety, bottled water plants are only inspected on average every three years.  Banning the export of bottled water, drinking tap water at home and carrying refillable water bottles are important ways to preserve fresh water and a good way to mark World Water Day.

 

Mary Cowper-Smith,

Council of Canadians, P.E.I. Chapter

 

The supply of fresh water around the world is disappearing and many parts of the world already face severe water shortages. Exporting P.E.I.’s precious fresh water is indeed a mistake.

Watersheds across Canada are under threat from this practice.  Fortunately, the popularity of bottled water has decreased significantly in the past few years. According to Statistics Canada, in 2013, 23 per cent of households drank bottled water as their main source of drinking water compared to 30 per cent of households in 2007. People are realizing that it requires 3-5 litres of water to create a plastic, litre-sized bottle and that the manufacture and transport of bottled water requires a great deal of fossil fuel. 

They are recognizing that some bottled water actually consists of municipal water, including at least one brand on P.E.I.  They are concerned about the serious problems caused by discarded plastic bottles. And they are learning that while municipal water is tested at least daily for safety, bottled water plants are only inspected on average every three years.  Banning the export of bottled water, drinking tap water at home and carrying refillable water bottles are important ways to preserve fresh water and a good way to mark World Water Day.

 

Mary Cowper-Smith,

Council of Canadians, P.E.I. Chapter

 

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