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CHEERS & JEERS: Seniors get high on P.E.I.

A seniors' hiking group who walk about 12 km each Wednesday on different trails throughout Prince Edward Island, decided to celebrate on Oct. 17, the first day cannabis became legal, by deciding to walk to the highest point on Prince Edward Island, 459 ft, near Springton/Glen Valley. They wanted to get high on P.E.I.  
(Submitted Photo)
A seniors' hiking group who walk about 12 km each Wednesday on different trails throughout Prince Edward Island, decided to celebrate on Oct. 17, the first day cannabis became legal, by deciding to walk to the highest point on Prince Edward Island, 459 ft, near Springton/Glen Valley. They wanted to get high on P.E.I. (Submitted Photo) - Contributed

Senior's group decided to walk to the highest point on the Island - 459 ft., near Springton/Glen Valley on cannabis legalization day, Oct. 17.

CHEERS: To a group of Islanders who chose to get “really high” in a fun, healthy way on Oct. 17, cannabis legalization day across Canada. Bernie Doiron and his wife belong to a hiking group who walk about 12 km each Wednesday on different trails throughout P.E.I. Last week’s walk fell on Oct. 17. To commemorate the date, the group decided to walk to the highest point on the Island - 459 ft., near Springton/Glen Valley. “Our motto was, “Get high on P.E.I.,” said Mr. Doiron. His group are all senior citizens and most have never smoked and, those who did, quit about 25 years ago. “So, smoking marijuana is probably not going to be habit-forming for any of us. I did overhear one of our members mentioned that they might experiment and nibble a cannabis brownie, providing that no one tells their grandchildren.” Mr. Doiron doesn’t think the government is going to reap much tax revenue from the sale of cannabis to his group, “who will continue to drink our red wine and/or prune juice.” Well done.

CHEERS: To the four candidates for mayor of Charlottetown who have agreed to participate in two crucial debates this week as campaigning for the Nov. 5 municipal election really starts to heat up. The first public debate is Wednesday evening at UPEI’s student centre where the Guardian and Eastlink are combining resources to spotlight the candidates for the first time together. Everyone is welcome. The next night, the Greater Charlottetown Area Chamber of Commerce and Downtown Charlottetown Inc. (DCI) invite the public to attend a ‘Charlottetown Mayoral Candidates Debate’ from 7 – 9 p.m. at the Confederation Centre of the Arts’ Memorial Hall. The debates are seen as crucial to determining the outcome of the election among candidates Philip Brown, Kim Devine, Jamie Larkin and Cecil Villard.

JEERS: To Elections P.E.I. for not including the new municipality of Three Rivers within its mandate for municipal elections Nov. 5. Elections P.E.I. has long co-ordinated voting in the Island’s four largest municipalities of Charlottetown, Summerside, Stratford and Cornwall where nominations closed on Friday, Oct. 19 for those interested in running for mayor or councillor. Three Rivers, which incorporates seven eastern P.E.I. municipal units, is holding its first-ever joint election. If ever a municipality needed some help with the voting process this year, it’s Three Rivers which has approximately 7,500 residents, larger than Cornwall and close behind Stratford. There is sure to be some confusion over the election process.

CHEERS: To Forage P.E.I. which hosted the scene for a Guinness world record-setting attempt to create the longest charcuterie (meats, cheeses and condiments) board in history. The attempt took place Friday, Oct. 19 as part of the 1st Annual Forage Food Symposium. Over three hundred attendees from across Canada including chefs, farmers, artisan food producers and brewers participated in the attempt, part of a 6-hour interactive feast hosted by Chef Michael Smith and his fire brigade at The Inn at Bay Fortune. The board was 52 ft. 3.25 inches and included over 100 various ingredients. Currently there is no standing record for the longest charcuterie board, which had to be one continuous slab lifted one foot off the table. The lift was a success. Results of the attempt have been sent to the Guinness officials to determine if they meet the organization's criteria.

CHEERS: To Parks Canada which announced the designation earlier this month of new persons, places, and events of national significance – including one from P.E.I. The Island designation is: “Construction of the Prince Edward Island Railway National Historic Event: Built in 1871, the construction of the Prince Edward Island Railway created a transportation link across the island. This railway was more than an economic opportunity which created jobs, it was a social and cultural link between communities and played a significant role in bringing Prince Edward Island into Confederation.” The designations are made on the recommendation of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.

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