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Kensington's public works supervisor commits to desludging, upgrading municipal lagoons

Doug Killam, left, public works manager for the Town of Kensington, shows the certificate of appreciation from the town with Kensington Mayor Rowan Caseley and chief administrative officer Geoff Baker. Killam has completed course work with the Environmental Training Institute.
Doug Killam, left, public works manager for the Town of Kensington, shows the certificate of appreciation from the town with Kensington Mayor Rowan Caseley and chief administrative officer Geoff Baker. Killam has completed course work with the Environmental Training Institute. - Contributed
KENSINGTON, P.E.I. —

The Town of Kensington’s Water and Pollution Control Commission is in good hands these days. 

The town’s public works supervisor, Doug Killam, has been working on certification with the Environmental Training Institute for the last couple of years, said Kensington’s chief administrative officer Geoff Baker.

“Doug is 99 per cent now prepared to write his certification exam in September,” said Baker.

He presented Killam with a certificate in recognition of his achievement at the June 8 council meeting.

“Excellent work, Doug. This is highly technical and complex stuff he is learning – heavy on math and things of that nature. So, congratulations again, Doug, and well deserved.”

Killam’s training is timely as the town has committed to desludging and upgrading the municipal lagoons in 2020.

Pending approval from the provincial Department of Environment, the town’s water and pollution commission will remove the sludge in the lower lagoon, install a baffle on the outlet pipe and reinforce the berms. The work will make for greater capacity of the wastewater lagoon system.  

Three tenders were received, and the town decided to award the work to Kildare Construction, which is committed to completing the work for $435,849.54 including HST. 

The construction is scheduled to take 15 weeks and will be competed in October.

The Invest in Canada Infrastructure Fund will supply $390,000 for the work, and the Town of Kensington will make up the difference of $140,800 with long-term borrowing.

The previous lagoon work was done in the 1990s.


Alison Jenkins is a local journalism initiative reporter, a position funded by the federal government.

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