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UPDATE: More freezing rain, flurries expected for P.E.I. Monday

Steve Norsworthy, manager of Hunter’s Ale House, clears off the sidewalk in front of the Charlottetown establishment for customers during Sunday’s storm. The weather system was expected to bring more freezing rain and flurries to the province Monday.
Steve Norsworthy, manager of Hunter’s Ale House, clears off the sidewalk in front of the Charlottetown establishment for customers during Sunday’s storm. The weather system was expected to bring more freezing rain and flurries to the province Monday. - Katherine Hunt

Remnants of Sunday's winter storm will linger into Monday, according to Environment Canada.

Temperatures were expected to drop to below freezing again Monday, which will turn rain back into freezing rain in the morning before changing to flurries for the rest of the day.

The weather could lead to some treacherous road conditions Monday morning, said Environment Canada.

“As the warm air pushes off in the morning and the cold air comes around, that rain is going to change back over to some freezing rain or ice pellets briefly,” said Environment Canada meteorologist Ian Hubbard. “Then for most of the day after that, when the temperatures are below zero and we start to see some winds from the northwest, we’re probably looking at flurries.”

Between 15 and 20 cm of snow was forecasted to drop during Sunday’s storm.

By 1 p.m., only 4 cm of snow had fallen at the Charlottetown airport, according to Environment Canada.

More snow was expected to fall in Prince County than Queens and Kings, said Hubbard.

Charlottetown resident Elmira Moghimi took a walk in the storm to buy a birthday gift for a family member.

It was the first time she had ever been walking in a winter storm since moving to P.E.I. from Iran a year and a half ago.

“It’s quite weird and I’m feeling insecure because (the weather is) getting worse but I’m still enjoying it because celebrating a family member is worth it,” she said.

Meanwhile, Wade Pound of Charlottetown said he decided to walk in the weather to get something to eat at the soup kitchen and then buy some bread to feed the birds.

“I’m not coming back out after this,” said Pound.

Sunday’s snow changed to freezing rain and ice pellets in the afternoon, which caused some hazardous driving conditions in the province.

A warm wind changed the freezing rain to rain and temperatures were expected to reach as high as 9 C overnight before turning back into freezing rain Monday morning.

A wind warning was also in effect for the province.

Gusts were expected reach up to 90 km/h as it the storm system pushed south.

Hubbard said most of the wind gusts were along coastal areas.

katherine.hunt@theguardian.pe.ca

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