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Two people with P.E.I. connections become members of Order of Canada

Allan Andrews of Cornwall accepts the member insignia of the Order of Canada from Govenor General Julie Payette during a ceremony earlier this week. Photo special to The Guardian by Sgt Johanie Maheu/Rideau Hall
Allan Andrews of Cornwall accepts the member insignia of the Order of Canada from Governor General Julie Payette during a ceremony earlier this week. Photo special to The Guardian by Sgt Johanie Maheu/Rideau Hall - Contributed

OTTAWA - Two people with Island connections recently became members of the Order of Canada.

Allan Andrews of Cornwall and Vianne Timmons accepted the member insignia of the Order of Canada from Governor General Julie Payette during a ceremony earlier this week.

Generations of athletes have benefited from Andrews’ wisdom both on and off the ice.

Founder of a renowned hockey school, he has mentored and coached thousands of players of all levels.

His innovative curriculum, which has been emulated across the country and beyond, focuses on technical skills as well as lifelong lessons in sportsmanship and team spirit.

Vianne Timmons, left accepts the Officer insignia of the Order of Canada, from Govenor General Julie Payette during a ceremony earlier this week. Photo special to The Guardian by Sgt Johanie Maheu/Rideau Hall
Vianne Timmons, left accepts the Officer insignia of the Order of Canada, from Governor General Julie Payette during a ceremony earlier this week. Photo special to The Guardian by Sgt Johanie Maheu/Rideau Hall

Known for his generosity, he has been actively involved in many sports and wellness organizations in his community.

The governor general invested two Companions, 15 Officers and 24 Members into the Order of Canada at Rideau Hall.

Timmons, according to her citation, has enriched her community through her bold and compassionate leadership.

An accomplished and prolific researcher in the fields of literacy and inclusive education, she is now president and vice-chancellor of the University of Regina.

An advocate for women in leadership roles, she has also given voice to and created opportunities for people with disabilities, both at home and abroad.

In 1996, Timmons joined the faculty of education at the University of Prince Edward Island, and became vice-president, academic development in 2001 – a position she held until coming to the University of Regina in September 2008.


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