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Stratford in talks with Charlottetown and province over sewage

Stratford Mayor David Dunphy shows off some of the town's new Blue Frog units at the sewage lagoon.
Stratford Mayor David Dunphy shows off some of the town's new Blue Frog units at the sewage lagoon.

STRATFORD, P.E.I. – The Town of Stratford could have a long-term solution in place on its sewage by the end of the month.

Mayor David Dunphy said the town is in talks with the provincial government and City of Charlottetown on a plan that would see Stratford pump its sewage over to the plant on Riverside Drive.

Stratford recently said it preferred to solve the problem on its own but the provincial government didn’t like that idea too much.

“There are deadlines on funding we we’re trying to get an agreement in place to see if we can make something (happen) with the province and the City of Charlottetown,’’ Dunphy said. “We’re working out the best (solution) we can with the Charlottetown option and we’re trying to find ways to make that work.’’

An agreement could see Stratford get a discount on hooking into the Charlottetown sewage plant.

Charlottetown and Stratford are working together on this at the request of the province.

An agreement could see a 15 per cent surcharge for administration and historical costs to Stratford, below the 25 per cent customers outside the capital city normally pay.

Charlottetown Mayor Clifford Lee said Stratford could get a discount for a few reasons.

One of them is because bringing Stratford on would unlock millions of dollars in federal and provincial dollars. Those dollars would also help Charlottetown decommission the sewage lagoon in the neighbourhood of East Royalty. That sewage will instead be going through the new pipes to the Riverside Drive wastewater treatment plant.

“We basically have a project application going to the province for 75 per cent funding to accommodate the sewage from Stratford and also the sewage from East Royalty,’’ Lee said.

“If we don’t do the Stratford component then there’s no assurances we’re going to receive any funding on the East Royalty part. Here, council is saying to get millions of dollars we’re (willing) to give up a few thousand dollars (to Stratford) on the surcharge.’’

At present, Charlottetown has 69 customers outside the city that pay the 25 per cent surcharge. Each one of those customers has a flow rate of 82 cubic metres a day. Bringing Stratford on to the Charlottetown system means an additional 3,300 cubic metres a day.

Dunphy said it all comes down to money.

“It’s all down to financing and (being) cost controlled going forward. If we can get a good agreement with the City of Charlottetown and funding from the province then we can make that work. Our goal is to have a long-term solution for the (Stratford) wastewater treatment plant.’’

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Twitter.com/DveStewart

Mayor David Dunphy said the town is in talks with the provincial government and City of Charlottetown on a plan that would see Stratford pump its sewage over to the plant on Riverside Drive.

Stratford recently said it preferred to solve the problem on its own but the provincial government didn’t like that idea too much.

“There are deadlines on funding we we’re trying to get an agreement in place to see if we can make something (happen) with the province and the City of Charlottetown,’’ Dunphy said. “We’re working out the best (solution) we can with the Charlottetown option and we’re trying to find ways to make that work.’’

An agreement could see Stratford get a discount on hooking into the Charlottetown sewage plant.

Charlottetown and Stratford are working together on this at the request of the province.

An agreement could see a 15 per cent surcharge for administration and historical costs to Stratford, below the 25 per cent customers outside the capital city normally pay.

Charlottetown Mayor Clifford Lee said Stratford could get a discount for a few reasons.

One of them is because bringing Stratford on would unlock millions of dollars in federal and provincial dollars. Those dollars would also help Charlottetown decommission the sewage lagoon in the neighbourhood of East Royalty. That sewage will instead be going through the new pipes to the Riverside Drive wastewater treatment plant.

“We basically have a project application going to the province for 75 per cent funding to accommodate the sewage from Stratford and also the sewage from East Royalty,’’ Lee said.

“If we don’t do the Stratford component then there’s no assurances we’re going to receive any funding on the East Royalty part. Here, council is saying to get millions of dollars we’re (willing) to give up a few thousand dollars (to Stratford) on the surcharge.’’

At present, Charlottetown has 69 customers outside the city that pay the 25 per cent surcharge. Each one of those customers has a flow rate of 82 cubic metres a day. Bringing Stratford on to the Charlottetown system means an additional 3,300 cubic metres a day.

Dunphy said it all comes down to money.

“It’s all down to financing and (being) cost controlled going forward. If we can get a good agreement with the City of Charlottetown and funding from the province then we can make that work. Our goal is to have a long-term solution for the (Stratford) wastewater treatment plant.’’

[email protected]

Twitter.com/DveStewart

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