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Parks Canada says nature will take care of thousands of shellfish that washed ashore last week

Thousands of shellfish are shown washed up on shore at Robinson’s Island in the P.E.I. National Park after last week’s storm, among other damage to trees and the coastline. A lobster expert said these storms typically happen during the fall and that it won’t affect the overall lobster population. -Brian McInnis/Special to The Guardian
Thousands of shellfish are shown washed up on shore at Robinson’s Island in the P.E.I. National Park after last week’s storm, among other damage to trees and the coastline. A lobster expert said these storms typically happen during the fall and that it won’t affect the overall lobster population. -Brian McInnis/Special to The Guardian

Parks Canada said there will be no cleanup involving thousands of shellfish that washed up on Robinson’s Island on P.E.I.’s north shore after last week’s storm.

In a statement emailed to The Guardian on Thursday from its communications department, Parks Canada said a cleanup isn’t necessary.

“Parks Canada has seen shellfish wash up occasionally following storm surge events… although the amount seen at Robinson’s Island is a larger quantity that we have seen before. The birds and animals will feast on the shellfish that were washed ashore and shellfish populations will continue to flourish in the area in natural cycles,’’ Parks Canada said.

Staff with Parks Canada have not yet walked the entire coastline since the storm but they do expect some dune modifications from the heavy surf. For example, in Dalvay, dunes have been sheared off by three to eight feet in some areas along the coastline.

“There is no cause for concern here. The beaches along the north shore are constantly changing and in the P.E.I. National Park. Because sand movement is a natural process that reinforces the ecological integrity of the area, no interventions are planned.’’

The stairs to the beach at Greenwich were washed down the beach several kilometres but can likely be salvaged. The stairs will be stored for the winter months and put back in the spring.

Several culverts and outflows in the park were blocked due to sand movement and they have been cleared with a backhoe. This ensures a passage for water and protects the roads and trails in those areas from potential flooding during high water events.

Parks Canada also reported that many trees were down in the trails, on roads and in the campgrounds. The roads and trails have been cleared and the campgrounds will be cleaned up in the spring.

There was also a tree down on power lines near the Dalvay compound but Maritime Electric has fixed the problem.

Parks Canada is asking visitors who come across anything of concern to call 902-672-6350.

dave.stewart@theguardian.pe.ca

Twitter.com/DveStewart

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