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Fight over land near North Rustico lighthouse still not resolved


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Emard Court is 92.

Kendra Curtis thinks the federal government is waiting for him to die.

Court has been involved in a land dispute with the government for several years over land where a septic tank for his house sits next to the North Rustico lighthouse.

Curtis, who has power of attorney over Court's affairs, said a tentative deal was signed in April 2015 with a condition the government would complete a land survey.

"The survey they gave us was wrong," Curtis said.

What she said Court received didn't match the drawing for the new property boundary lines that were part of the tentative agreement.

Curtis said they sent back comments to the government after receiving the survey in July and have since heard nothing.

"I think they are just waiting for Emard to die and not be a problem any more," she said.

RELATED: 90-year-old North Rustico man fears losing home

RELATED: North Rustico land fight raised in Parliament

Public Services and Procurement Canada is working on the Department of Fisheries and Oceans' behalf to get rid of the surplus lighthouse.

Before it can do that, the government has to settle the land dispute with the Court family.

That dispute was over the initial plan to change ownership of the lighthouse, along with some of the land around it, which included the area covering Court's septic bed.

Court has lived in his home his entire life and without the septic bed he would have to move.

In 1915, the federal government expropriated land around the lighthouse, including where Emard's house sits.

The Court family has been involved with court cases and attempts to settle the land title for more than 20 years.

Curtis said the government hasn't given any explanation about what is happening with the tentative agreement.

"It's just radio silence," she said.

For his part, Court had a stroke in February, but Curtis said he has been recovering.

"He doesn't seem to have any lasting effects from the stroke," she said.

The Guardian made an attempt to contact Public Services and Procurement Canada about the land dispute.

In an email statement, a spokeswoman said the department could not comment on specifics because of privacy regulations.

"We continue to work towards a resolution," she said.

rross@theguardian.pe.ca

twitter.com/ryanrross

Emard Court is 92.

Kendra Curtis thinks the federal government is waiting for him to die.

Court has been involved in a land dispute with the government for several years over land where a septic tank for his house sits next to the North Rustico lighthouse.

Curtis, who has power of attorney over Court's affairs, said a tentative deal was signed in April 2015 with a condition the government would complete a land survey.

"The survey they gave us was wrong," Curtis said.

What she said Court received didn't match the drawing for the new property boundary lines that were part of the tentative agreement.

Curtis said they sent back comments to the government after receiving the survey in July and have since heard nothing.

"I think they are just waiting for Emard to die and not be a problem any more," she said.

RELATED: 90-year-old North Rustico man fears losing home

RELATED: North Rustico land fight raised in Parliament

Public Services and Procurement Canada is working on the Department of Fisheries and Oceans' behalf to get rid of the surplus lighthouse.

Before it can do that, the government has to settle the land dispute with the Court family.

That dispute was over the initial plan to change ownership of the lighthouse, along with some of the land around it, which included the area covering Court's septic bed.

Court has lived in his home his entire life and without the septic bed he would have to move.

In 1915, the federal government expropriated land around the lighthouse, including where Emard's house sits.

The Court family has been involved with court cases and attempts to settle the land title for more than 20 years.

Curtis said the government hasn't given any explanation about what is happening with the tentative agreement.

"It's just radio silence," she said.

For his part, Court had a stroke in February, but Curtis said he has been recovering.

"He doesn't seem to have any lasting effects from the stroke," she said.

The Guardian made an attempt to contact Public Services and Procurement Canada about the land dispute.

In an email statement, a spokeswoman said the department could not comment on specifics because of privacy regulations.

"We continue to work towards a resolution," she said.

rross@theguardian.pe.ca

twitter.com/ryanrross

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