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VIDEO: Northside East Bay teen stands for the ones who can’t

Logan Murphy, a private in the Canadian Armed Forces Reserves, was the picture of stillness and stoicism as he guarded the cenotaph during the Remembrance Day ceremony at Centre 200 in Sydney on Monday. “We are on guard for the ones who have fallen. We are on guard for the ones who can’t stand,” the 18-year-old Northside East Bay resident explained afterwards.
Logan Murphy, a private in the Canadian Armed Forces Reserves, was the picture of stillness and stoicism as he guarded the cenotaph during the Remembrance Day ceremony at Centre 200 in Sydney on Monday. “We are on guard for the ones who have fallen. We are on guard for the ones who can’t stand,” the 18-year-old Northside East Bay resident explained afterwards. - Chris Connors

'An honour to do it'

SYDNEY, N.S. —

Logan Murphy had a lot of time on Remembrance Day to reflect on the sacrifices veterans have made for the country. He also thought about his feet.

Logan Murphy
Logan Murphy

As one of the four people chosen to guard the cenotaph where wreaths were laid, the 18-year-old Northside East Bay resident had to stand perfectly still for the entire 90-minute ceremony at Centre 200 on Monday.

“I can’t feel my feet, if we’re being honest,” Murphy told the Cape Breton Post after the ceremony, which was attended by about 3,500 people.

A member of the Army reserves for the past two years, Murphy said the importance of being part of the cenotaph guard was at the forefront of his mind as he stood stoically with his head bowed and holding his rifle. Many members of family have served in the military, including his brother, Evan Murphy, who is in the Navy.

“We are on guard for the ones who have fallen. We are on guard for the ones who can’t stand. And just in doing that, it makes it all worthwhile,” said Murphy, who is a private in the Royal Canadian Reserves 36 Service Battalion and a craftsman in the Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

The colour guard procession marches out of Centre 200 following the Remembrance Day ceremony on Monday.
The colour guard procession marches out of Centre 200 following the Remembrance Day ceremony on Monday.

Sgt J.C. Savoie of the 36 Service Battalion said whenever a Remembrance Day service is held, the cenotaph must be protected at all times. He said Murphy and the others were carefully chosen for that duty.

J.C. Savoie
J.C. Savoie

The soldiers and cadets not only have to make sure their drill movements are perfect and precise, they practise staying position for prolonged periods.

“It’s not easy at all,” he said. “It’s not only physical but also mental because you’re just staring at the floor. There’s not much blood movement going on in your body so you hear of a lot of people either falling out or maybe even collapsing. The guys that we chose to do cenotaph guard this year, obviously we took that into consideration — you have to be mentally fit and physically fit, as well.”

Murphy said he’s honoured to do whatever he can to serve his country and pay tribute to those who served before him.

“It is indeed an honour to do it,” he said.

“I’m fully prepared to do whatever I have to for my country.”

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