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SaltWire Selects Sept. 22: Igor, 10 years later; love for Lebanon, a preschooler recovering from cancer, and messages in bottles

Emily Head, 7, of Coxheath, shows the message in a bottle she found while walking on the Sydney boardwalk with mother Stacy Head, last week. The bottle is connected to a Message in a Bottle Facebook page with members hiding bottles to inspire people to either keep or hide the bottle again or create their own. Sharon Montgomery-Dupe • Cape Breton Post
Emily Head, 7, of Coxheath, shows the message in a bottle she found while walking on the Sydney boardwalk with mother Stacy Head, last week. The bottle is connected to a Message in a Bottle Facebook page with members hiding bottles to inspire people to either keep or hide the bottle again or create their own. Sharon Montgomery-Dupe • Cape Breton Post - Sharon Montgomery

These stories about Atlantic Canada's people and their communities are worth your time today

A decade after the storm 

It was 10 years ago this week that hurricane Igor scoured Newfoundland.

Storm surges, 140 km/h winds and rain came with one of the worst storm's in the province's history. 

“I’ll never forget it. The last 10 years have been hard,” Mary Duffett told The Telegram's Rosie Mullaley Sept. 21, as she shared the story of her husband Allan's death during Igor. 

“It goes through my mind all the time, but today has been really hard.”

Allan died as he walked along the road outside his Lower Lance Cove home on his way to check on his boat. 

"(T)he ground gave way beneath him and he was swept out to sea, carried away into a torrent of water and large debris," Mullaley writes. 

Read more about how Newfoundlanders are remembering the storm

Random Island after the rain from hurricane Igor stopped. September 2010. — SaltWire Network File photo
Random Island after the rain from hurricane Igor stopped. September 2010. — - SaltWire Network File Photo

Looking for hurricane Teddy information? Check your weather page for Cindy Day's latest forecast. 


Sending love to Lebanon

Jaden Lawen's regular summer trip is to Lebanon to see family and friends, but the global pandemic kept him at home in Halifax this year. 

When the Aug. 4 explosion shook Beirut and hurt some of his loved ones, the Nova Scotia teenager wanted to jump in and help. 

"I thought, ‘What could I do from where I am? How can I effectively help these people who have no voice, have nothing, to help shed light on them?’” Lawen told The Chronicle Herald's Noushin Ziafati

He has been fundraising ever since with Halifax to Beirut with Love, which has now reached almost $100,000, and he's not going to stop soon. 

“Honestly, I feel quite blessed that the community here in Halifax and the entire national community has supported this and how the city is so supportive,” Lawen said. 

Find out how you can contribute

Halifax student Jaden Lawen started a fundraiser in August to support the Canadian Red Cross' Beirut relief efforts. To date, his Halifax to Beirut with Love fundraiser has raised nearly $100,000. - Contributed
Halifax student Jaden Lawen started a fundraiser in August to support the Canadian Red Cross' Beirut relief efforts. To date, his Halifax to Beirut with Love fundraiser has raised nearly $100,000. - Contributed

Welcome home! 

Four-year-old Camden has been away from his Prince Edward Island home for most of 2020 to undergo treatment for brain cancer in Halifax, Toronto and Boston.

His community of Travellers Rest  wanted to show the boy they're happy that he is home and well.

Given the COVID-19 restrictions, a party was out, but a parade was in.

More than 120 vehicles, from bicycles to tractor-trailers, participated in a welcome-home parade for the boy and his family, SaltWire's Jason Simmonds reports.

“We are so happy to be able to see that family put back together," Camden's grandfather Rod Kingyens told Simmonds.  

"We are just praying and hoping that the treatments worked for Camden, but we are sure happy he’s healthy right now, he’s enjoying himself and having so much fun. The community support has been amazing and overwhelming for us." 

Grab a tissue and watch the video

The Kingyens family greets well-wishers during a drive-by welcome home parade on the Gunning Shore Road, near Summerside, on Sunday afternoon. Four-year-old Camden, seated left, recently completed treatments in Boston for medulloblastoma, the most common type of brain cancer in children. Camden is joined by his seven-year-old brother, Nate, and his parents, Victoria and Matt Kingyens. - Jason Simmonds
The Kingyens family greets well-wishers during a drive-by welcome home parade on the Gunning Shore Road, near Summerside, on Sunday afternoon. Four-year-old Camden, seated left, recently completed treatments in Boston for medulloblastoma, the most common type of brain cancer in children. Camden is joined by his seven-year-old brother, Nate, and his parents, Victoria and Matt Kingyens. - Jason Simmonds

Spreading good wishes

"Messages in a bottle traditionally found in the sea are drifting into hospitals, ferries, takeout establishments, parks, beaches and even trees across Nova Scotia," The Cape Breton Post's Sharon Montgomery-Dupe writes. 

The pretty little bottles containing trinkets and messages are meant to lift spirits and the growing participation in an associated Facebook group show they're doing the trick

Nova Scotian Edwina Donovan, originally from Glace Bay, started the Facebook group and bottle project to brighten days with positive message. 

“Some put different things like sparkles in it,” Donavan told Montgomery-Dupe. “I use beach glass.”

The idea – and the bottles – have spread further than the Maritimes. 

See a map of where some of the good wishes have been found, whether they are re-hidden or treasured forever

Edwina Donovan, a native of Glace Bay who now lives in Halifax, shows some new messages in a bottle she created to hide. Donovan organized the Message in a Bottle Facebook site two years ago which now has almost 800 members. The messages are created to provide inspiration. - Contributed
Edwina Donovan, a native of Glace Bay who now lives in Halifax, shows some new messages in a bottle she created to hide. Donovan organized the Message in a Bottle Facebook site two years ago which now has almost 800 members. The messages are created to provide inspiration. - Contributed

Troubled bay 

While storm-preparations have calmed some tensions around St. Mary's Bay, N.S., SaltWire journalists are still covering the lobster fishery dispute, where both Indigenous and non-Indigenous fishers are unhappy with the federal government. 

Columnist John DeMont covered Burnt Church 21 years ago and he reflects on that violent incident in New Brunswick and what is happening today off of Nova Scotia

At the Saulnierville wharf on Sept. 19. - Tina Comeau
At the Saulnierville wharf on Sept. 19. - Tina Comeau

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