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SaltWire Selects June 24: Stories from the East Coast to read today


A male purple finch, which was photographed in Ben Eoin on Friday, showed the telltale signs of trichomonosis: regurgitated food, difficulty swallowing and lethargy. - Jeannie Fraser
A male purple finch showed the telltale signs of trichomonosis: regurgitated food, difficulty swallowing and lethargy. - Jeannie Fraser/File

These stories about Atlantic Canadians and their communities are worth your time


Addressing hate 

"The same day a Membertou elder successfully lobbied to have Cornwallis street signs in Sydney (Cape Breton) removed, an elder in Halifax received a hate-filled email," The Cape Breton Post's Nikki Sullivan writes. 

“He agreed we had to make this public, to show people how Mi’kmaw people in Nova Scotia are subjected to this (type of racist beliefs)... My 80-year-old uncle (Danny N. Paul) didn’t deserve this,” Chief Terry Paul of Membertou told Sullivan. 

Danny N. Paul and his friend, Membertou elder Danny J. Paul, have been asking for the removal of Cornwallis's name for decades and both say they think their recent success in Sydney triggered the racist correspondence. 

Danny J. Paul points to a street sign in the Ashby neighbourhood of Sydney that did bear the Cornwallis Street sign. A Cape Breton Regional Municipality public works crew removed all nine street signs bearing the 18th-century British general's name on Monday. KAREN RUSHTON-PAUL/FACEBOOK
Danny J. Paul points to a street sign in the Ashby neighbourhood of Sydney that did bear the Cornwallis Street sign. A Cape Breton Regional Municipality public works crew removed all nine street signs bearing the 18th-century British general's name on Monday. KAREN RUSHTON-PAUL/FACEBOOK - Contributed

The reopening dilemma

As COVID-19 restrictions continue to be lifted in Newfoundland and Labrador, the legal rights of consumers, workers and business owners are a concern.

As the Telegram's David Maher reports, businesses that fail to adhere to public safety guidelines could be opening themselves up to lawsuits, while recourse is more complicated for workers who may get sick on the job. 

Meanwhile, businesses may have a challenge in having insurance companies cover the interruption in business as a result of the pandemic. 

Read Maher's story to find out what the options are for customers, employees and owners alike

Newfoundland and Labrador Federation of Labour president Mary Shortall. TELEGRAM FILE PHOTO
Newfoundland and Labrador Federation of Labour president Mary Shortall. TELEGRAM FILE PHOTO


Protecting feathered friends

Birders in the Maritimes should be on the lookout for sick finches, SaltWire's Alison Jenkins reports, after the season's first case of trichomonosis was reported in Nova Scotia last week. 

Purple finch, goldfinch and pine siskin are the most commonly impacted species, Dr. Laura Bourque told Jenkins. 

The disease is caused by a parasite birds can pick up at backyard feeders and baths during the summer months, so bird lovers should take precautions.

Learn more about the disease, how to spot afflicted birds and birdfeeder hygeine

This female purple finch exhibits classic signs of trichomonosis in song birds, including difficulty swallowing, matted wet feathers and food particles around the face and the beak and ruffled feathers. - Canadian Wildlife Health Co-operative/Special to The Guardian
This female purple finch exhibits classic signs of trichomonosis in song birds, including difficulty swallowing, matted wet feathers and food particles around the face and the beak and ruffled feathers. - Canadian Wildlife Health Co-operative/Special to The Guardian - Contributed

Creative during COVID

He doesn't have kids, but Charlottetown's Mikey Wasnidge -- pen name Mike Woz -- "decided on a whim to write a book that addressed the challenge many youngsters have faced during the ongoing pandemic — being stuck inside," The Guardian's Dave Stewart reports.

Illustrated by Halifax's Sara Panchaud, the self-published children's book, When the World Stays Inside, has proven popular with Amazon shoppers. 

“I do think a lot about how the future of the community is really impacted by the health of the youth today," Wasnidge told Stewart. 

"During this pandemic, I found myself often thinking about the families that were locked inside, how stressful that can be and how the long-term of that kind of stress could play out in our community."

Many people know Mikey Wasnidge from the Nimrods floating pizza restaurant on the Charlottetown waterfront. But he’s now also an author of a children’s book that has been a hot seller on Amazon this month. - Dave Stewart
Many people know Mikey Wasnidge from the Nimrods floating pizza restaurant on the Charlottetown waterfront. But he’s now also an author of a children’s book that has been a hot seller on Amazon this month. - Dave Stewart

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