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SaltWire Selects July 8: Atlantic Canadian stories you don't want to miss

Eastern Express takes on the Mid-Isle Mustangs under the new lights at the JD MacIntyre Memorial Field in Cardigan on July 3.
Eastern Express takes on the Mid-Isle Mustangs under the new lights at the JD MacIntyre Memorial Field in Cardigan on July 3. - Daniel Brown/Local Journalism Reporter

These stories of East Coast people and their communities are worth your time

Selfportrait of an aritst in quarantine 

"Ceramics artist Naomi Walsh calls her baked and glazed clay still life Got a Job Needs Doing, which reflects her position as the co-op’s gallery manager — “I’m the one who buys the toilet paper and the hand sanitizer” — and her love of home renovation and gardening," The Chronicle Herald's Stephen Cooke writes

Describing Walsh's piece as "a collection of ceramic versions of items like a can of paint with brushes, a cordless drill and a pair of garden shears, that shows her skill as well as her sense of humour," Cooke brings readers a glimpse into a new exhibit at Halifax's Art 1274 Hollis called  "The Isolation Project — Self-Reflection." 

Read more about the exhibit and how to see it.

Ceramics artist Naomi Walsh displays her quarantine self-portrait work called Got A Job Needs Doing? at Art 1274 Hollis Gallery. The Halifax artists' co-op, with 23 local artists and artisans, begins The Isolation Project — Self-Reflection exhibit starting on Wednesday afternoon. - Eric Wynne
Ceramics artist Naomi Walsh displays her quarantine self-portrait work called Got A Job Needs Doing? at Art 1274 Hollis Gallery. The Halifax artists' co-op, with 23 local artists and artisans, begins The Isolation Project — Self-Reflection exhibit starting on Wednesday afternoon. - Eric Wynne

 Hall problems

Still the heart of many places across the region, community halls are suffering their own pandemic problems. 

Home to parties, jam sessions, concerts and fitness classes, many have had their revenue stream and their volunteers' ability to get work done curtailed or cancelled 

SaltWire's Ashley Thompson talked to volunteers with small community halls in Nova Scotia's Annapolis Valley to find out the effect of the pandemic on these little treasures, as well as plans for the other side of COVID. 

Bill Crossman heads up a solar electricity project that could see the Centrelea Community Hall producing 25 kilowatts of electricity and getting paid for it by Nova Scotia Power. If they knock down the $53,000 capital cost through grants, they could be making a profit right from the start. - Lawrence Powell
Bill Crossman heads up a solar electricity project that could see the Centrelea Community Hall producing 25 kilowatts of electricity and getting paid for it by Nova Scotia Power. If they knock down the $53,000 capital cost through grants, they could be making a profit right from the start. - Lawrence Powell

Essential skills

Cassandra Bruhm, who lives in Mahone Bay, N.S., just finished her first year of university and now knows first-hand what recent graduates need to know to survive in a post-high school world.

“Know how to cook some basic meals, as it could really save you from some of the gross meal hall food,” Bruhm tells Laura Churchill Duke, writing for SaltWire. 

Michael Hoy of Montague, P.E.I., agrees. He says the best skill his mother ever taught him was how to cook for himself. She taught me how to make full, well-balanced meals, he says.

“Cooking is just such an important skill, and I know guys now who eat exclusively takeout because being in and around a kitchen intimidates them,” he says.

Churchill Duke went straight to the students to find out which nine essential skills new grads are going to need as they forge out on their own

Knowing how to cook some basic meals is important for young people before they leave home.  - RF Stock
Knowing how to cook some basic meals is important for young people before they leave home. - RF Stock


Friday night lights

People lined up along the fence of the JD MacIntyre Memorial Field in Cardigan, P.E.I., last week, ready to witness history.

It was the first ball game in a season that had been delayed due to COVID-19.

But the biggest draw of the 13U Triple-A division matchup between the Eastern Express versus the Mid-Isle Mustangs was that it was the first time a ball game had been played in Cardigan after sunset.

Kris O'Brien, president of the community's minor baseball association, tells the Guardian's Daniel Brown that, until recently, there was no infrastructure to host a night game. However, that’s no longer the case thanks to the recent installation of several field lights that can help grow both the sport and the community.

"The sky's the limit, right now," says O'Brien. "This is probably a 25-year dream for Cardigan."

Click/tap to check out more stunning post-sunset photos from the diamond

The JD MacIntyre Memorial Field in Cardigan on July 3. - Daniel Brown/Local Journalism Initiative Reporter
The JD MacIntyre Memorial Field in Cardigan on July 3. - Daniel Brown/Local Journalism Initiative Reporter


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