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CBRM women caring during COVID-19

Members of 100 Women Who Care CBRM presented the North Sydney Food Bank Society with cheques totalling more than $10,000 during their last in-person at Casino Nova Scotia in Sydney on March 3. From left are 100 Women Who Care CBRM members Rose Westbury, Paulette McKenna, Margie Moore, Eileen McIntyre and co-founder Deana Lloy, along with Lawrence Shebib, John Oram and Karen Oram of the North Sydney Food Bank Society, as well as Shelley Bennett Trifos, Shelley Lund, Irene Carroll and Pat Foley of 100 Women Who Care CBRM. Contributed
Members of 100 Women Who Care CBRM presented the North Sydney Food Bank Society with cheques totalling more than $10,000 during their last in-person at Casino Nova Scotia in Sydney on March 3. From left are 100 Women Who Care CBRM members Rose Westbury, Paulette McKenna, Margie Moore, Eileen McIntyre and co-founder Deana Lloy, along with Lawrence Shebib, John Oram and Karen Oram of the North Sydney Food Bank Society, as well as Shelley Bennett Trifos, Shelley Lund, Irene Carroll and Pat Foley of 100 Women Who Care CBRM. Contributed
SYDNEY, N.S. —

A group of local women is proving it’s still possible to care through COVID.

On Dec. 1, 100 Women Who Care CBRM will vote on which local charity will receive their latest cheque for more than $10,000.

Shelley Bennett Trifos, one of the core team members, said they wondered how the global pandemic would reduce the number of women who could contribute the $100 each person contributes. However, the past two meetings have topped 110 members.

“That was a concern of ours — that our numbers might be down because of people’s inability to give right now. Perhaps business is down for them, or they might not be working, or working as much as they typically are. But, amazingly, we’ve stuck with it — they’re making it a priority.”

Bennett Trifos said she believes one reason why so many 100 Women Who Care CBRM contributors have continued to participate during COVID-19 is because they recognize their donations are now more important than ever.

“We’re in a time of struggle right now with the pandemic upon us and many charitable organizations have been unable to hold their major fundraisers. So, they’re short on funds, they’re short on supplies, they’re short on resources, and that impacts our community desperately — they need us now to step up.”

While the pandemic has prevented in-person meetings, as well as the pre-pitch networking sessions, Bennett Trifos said the result is ultimately the same, with a worthy community charity receiving a much-needed financial boost.

“The component that’s missing is the ability for a group of like-minded women to gather together in a really good, positive energy in the spirit of giving — it’s a giving circle — and we can’t gather together in a giving circle right now. But I think what has come through in all of this is the women who are involved in this group are in it for the right reasons. They’re in it to make a difference, and just because we can’t gather and have out networking session prior to the pitches, we’re still able to gather together virtually, pool our resources and make a significant impact donation. It just reinforces the fact that there’s certainly power in numbers. As individuals we can make a difference; as a group we can make a big difference.”

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