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Les Faux Pas to play show at Bonshaw Hall, Oct. 28

The lineup for Les Faux Pas includes, from left, Christina McLean, Alia Hack, Nathalie Arsenault and Julie Arsenault. The group will play at the monthly Ceilidh Concert at the Bonshaw Hall on Oct. 28.
The lineup for Les Faux Pas includes, from left, Christina McLean, Alia Hack, Nathalie Arsenault and Julie Arsenault. The group will play at the monthly Ceilidh Concert at the Bonshaw Hall on Oct. 28. - Contributed

The monthly Ceilidh Concert at the Bonshaw Hall on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2-4 p.m., will feature special guest performers Les Faux Pas​​, an Acadian roots music group, along with singer Cameron MacDuffee and step dancers Alexis MacLaren and Abigail Rogers.

Also ready to hit the stage will be local musicians Tony the Troubador, Phil Pineau and/or Herb MacDonald. Admission is by donation, with proceeds going to the McKillop Centre for Social Justice.

Les Faux Pas is comprised of fiddler Nathalie Arsenault, Julie Arsenault on guitar, Christina McLean on vocals and percussion and singer Alia Hack. They play traditional and modern Acadian tunes, folk songs and pop songs.

MacDuffee is a seasoned musical performer with the Charlottetown Festival and other theatres. This summer he portrayed King Herod in “Jesus Christ Superstar” and harmonica virtuoso David Bedford in the world premiere production of “On the Road with Dutch Mason”.

An assistant teacher at Somerset Dance Studio, Abigail Rogers from Central Bedeque learned to shuffle from Marlys MacLaren at the age of three, and now at 15 her feet fly. She has performed with The Barra MacNeils, in “Atlantic Blue with Tara MacLean”, the IWK telethon, Arts in Motion, “Ireland Meets Scotland”, Canada Day celebrations and ceilidhs across P.E.I.
Alexis MacLaren from South Freetown, is a young student at Somerset Dance Studio. Last summer she was a guest performer in the P.E.I. Small Halls Festival and in “Atlantic Blue: A Celebration of East Coast Songwriters”.

The MacKillop Centre for Social Justice was founded in Charlottetown in 1995 for the ongoing work of educating the public on matters of social justice at local, regional, national and international levels. Social justice concerns itself with the transformation of unjust social, political and economic structures including an emphasis on ecological problems most of which are the fallout of unjust economic, political and social structures.

The centre does research and analysis of these questions, carries out education programs with the public and works in coalitions with similar aims.

The ceilidh also includes a 50/50 draw, lunch and open stage time. All ages are welcome, and the hall is accessible for small wheelchairs. For more information, phone 902-675-4093 or go to the Facebook event page by clicking here.

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