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Filipinos share traditional dishes and lumpia is one of the favourites

Marjorie Benignos, from left, Angel Aylward and Jocelyn Romero display a plateful of ready-to-eat lumpia, a traditional dish in their native Philippines. They were making it for a pre-Christmas feast in Tignish. ERIC MCCARTHY/JOURNAL PIONEER
Marjorie Benignos, from left, Angel Aylward and Jocelyn Romero display a plateful of ready-to-eat lumpia, a traditional dish in their native Philippines. They were making it for a pre-Christmas feast in Tignish. ERIC MCCARTHY/JOURNAL PIONEER

Angel Bayarcal Aylward is placing a lot of hope in Santa Claus, or his representative, to deliver her a new deep fryer for Christmas.

Since moving to P.E.I. from the Philippines nearly three and a half years ago, Aylward had grown accustomed to using a deep fryer for cooking her traditional Filipino dishes. With a deep fryer, it’s easier to regulate the temperature of the hot fat and it’s safer, she notes.

However, as she and her friends prepared for a big pre-Christmas Filipino Feast at the Tignish Parish Centre recently, the lumpia-making team had to resort to cooking their popular dish in an open pot.

About 40 Filipinos, mostly fish plant workers in Tignish and area, recently prepared traditional dishes for the big feast, a meal they were sharing with invited Canadian friends and co-workers.
Lumpia is served as a finger food or as one of the ingredients in a meal, which almost certainly would include rice.

Once the wrappers are loaded and rolled, they are normally cut into two to three pieces before deep-frying. They can also be frozen raw and then dunked, still frozen, into the hot fat.

Aylward recommends against freezing cooked lumpia, as they lose their desired crunchiness.

She and her team, which includes Jocelyn Romero and Marjorie Benignos, were in charge of supplying the lumpia for the pre-Christmas meal. It’s a popular dish in the Philippines at Christmastime and for other special occasions, they note. Their Canadian friends call the dish spring rolls.

“It looks like spring rolls,” said Aylward, but she insists thats the only similarity. She’s proud of the traditional dish, a recipe passed down from her mother.

How many would one consume in one serving?

“It depends, because we have rice,” she answered.

“If there is no rice, more than five,” Benignos suggested.

Evidence of the dish’s popularity, was that it was a must-have for her wedding reception when she married Derek Aylward in Tignish in October 2016. She and her friends prepared 500 of the tubular-shaped treats, and there were no leftovers.

The friends use lumpia wrappers they found at a Chinese food store and said they are similar to the ones they use back home.

They are crepe pastry skins, thinner and larger than the egg-roll skins used locally.

The key ingredient for the filling is ground pork, which is combined with chopped onion, carrots and bell pepper.

Lumpia

One pound ground pork

One onion, chopped

One carrot, chopped

Half bell pepper, chopped

1 tsp. salt

1 tsp. ground pepper

1 egg

Lumpia wrappers

Procedure:

Mix first seven ingredients together in a large bowl. Mix thoroughly.

Arrange small amount lengthwise along leading edge of wrapper.

Roll up. Moisten trailing edge with bit of water to seal.

Cook in hot oil until lightly browned.

 

5 facts about lumpia

1 - Lumpia is a spring roll of Chinese origin commonly found in Indonesia and the Philippines.

2 - It is a savoury snack made of thin crepe pastry skin called "lumpia wrapper" enveloping a mixture of savoury fillings, consists of chopped vegetables (carrots, cabbages, green beans, bamboo shoots and leeks) or sometimes also minced meat (chicken, shrimp, pork or beef)

3 - In Indonesia, lumpia has become a favorite snack and is known as a street hawker food in the country. In the Philippines lumpia is one of the most common dishes found in any kind of gathering celebration.

4 - In the Netherlands and Belgium, it is spelled loempia, which is the old Indonesian spelling for lumpia, and has also become the generic name for "spring roll" in Dutch and French.

5 - A variant is the Vietnamese lumpia, wrapped in a thinner piece of pastry, in a size close to a spring roll though, the wrapping closes the ends off completely, which is typical for lumpia. In Venezuela, it is spelled "lumpia" and was introduced by the Chinese who migrated to South America.

SOURCE - wikipedia

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