Stratford man tries photocopier to make $100 bills

Ryan Ross
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Scales of justice

A Stratford man who used counterfeit $100 bills that were so poorly made they were the same on both sides was sentenced Friday to serve 90 days in jail.

Matthew James Daley, 25, appeared before Justice Wayne Cheverie in supreme court in Charlottetown for sentencing after he previously pleaded guilty to using a forged cheque and passing counterfeit bills.

The court heard that in October 2012, Daley used a cheque someone else had stolen, wrote it out to himself and cashed it at Cash Converters, which gave him $868.24.

On Dec. 8, 2012, Daley went to the Sobeys in Stratford where he bought tobacco and got change using a counterfeit $100 bill.

Daley used another counterfeit $100 bill on Dec. 10, 2012 at the Needs convenience store in Stratford.

Although he was successful in using the bills, the court heard they weren’t good replicas and Daley made them by using photocopied images he glued together.

The bills, which feature former prime minister Robert Borden, had his face on both sides of the bill instead of only one.

That detail led Cheverie to comment on the quality of the bills.

“Not only was Mr. Daley being a bad boy but he was passing bad stuff,” Cheverie said.

Defence lawyer Mitch MacLeod told the court that at the time Daley committed the offences he was at the height of an opiate addiction, but has been clean for 13 months.

MacLeod also said Daley only received $100 from the forged cheque, although he accepted responsibility for the full amount.

In handing down a sentence, Cheverie said Daley was a youthful offender with an unrelated record and the principal of rehabilitation came into play.

Cheverie saw the fact Daley has been clean for 13 months as a positive.

He then sentenced Daley to 20 days in jail for using the forged cheque and 70 days for passing the counterfeit bills, both to be served consecutively and on weekends so Daley can keep his job.

Daley will be on probation for two years once he is released.

Cheverie ordered Daley to stay away from Cash Converters, the Sobeys in Stratford and the Needs store in Stratford, unless he has written permission from his probation officer.

Daley will have to pay $868.24 in restitution to Cash Converters, $100 to Sobeys and $100 to Needs.

He will also have to pay $200 to the victims of crime fund.

rross@theguardian.pe.ca

twitter.com/ryanrross

Organizations: Sobeys

Geographic location: Stratford, Charlottetown

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Recent comments

  • anne
    April 07, 2014 - 18:35

    I completely feel this an appropriate situation for weekend sentencing to be considered. As a recovered addict myself i speak from experience on how difficult it is to get a job and return to being a productive member of society after you have burned many bridges in your life, as well as having a criminal record and having a reputation as an addict on PE. I understand all these roadblocks you meet when you try to turn your life around are self imposed but I also think if someone is trying and obviously having success (he has 13 months clean) at trying to turn their life around then its probably not in the best interest of he or society if this man loses the job that he has been able to secure. I think the judge made a good choice in sentancing this time. I have some compassion for this person and its nice to see that hes dealing with the past, paying for the consequences and moving on. Wish Mr.Daley well.

  • Captain Canuck
    April 07, 2014 - 10:29

    "Is that sentence convenient for you Mr. Daley, sir?" Hmm. "Good, just so long as we dont INCONVENIENCE you." slap.

  • Jack-o
    April 05, 2014 - 16:32

    Sentence doesn't surprise me. Probably some family connection to the provincial Liberals.

  • WHAT IS THE MATTER HERE
    April 05, 2014 - 14:57

    I cannot believe or understand the thinking of many people on this Island . Examples are HUH, and NOT HARD TO EXPLAIN. Shake you heads and try to follow the fact that breaking the law is a crime (at least in the civilized world and it appears from your comments you are trying to exclude PEI from the civilized world. Drug addiction and stupidity are not excuses for comiting crimes. If you truly believe that crimes should not be punished if people have jobs then you are no better then they are. Should we put that in the travel brochures, Come to PEI, WE ONLY BELIEVE IN WEEKEND JAIL TIME IF YOU ARE CAUGHT.

    • huh
      April 05, 2014 - 21:14

      you did notice that the judge gave him weekend sentencing, right? Here's some facts for you to follow: the concept is rooted in the criminal code. Its not just "some people's thinking". Part of the purpose of sentencing is to rehabilitate. A full time sentence can actually impede rehabilitation. So, if there are mitigating circumstances, weekend sentences can be given. Oh, and hold the presses on that brochure...this practice is not limited to PEI.

  • Dylan
    April 05, 2014 - 12:14

    Sooooo, this guy will go to jail longer then most drinking and driving offenders that I know and see in peu. Thats really sad and pathetic.

  • Critical Thinker
    April 05, 2014 - 11:04

    Some thoughts: This individual was an addict at the time and likely didn't have a job. So, the prospect of losing one doesn't enter his thinking. Neither does the 'deterrent' of prison since the first, second, and third priorities are getting the next fix. Something besides prison turned him around since he now has a job and has been clean for a year. I guess we could take his job away and send him to prison for a couple of months where he could become and addict again and come out broke and in need of a fix. Or we could have him spend a year checking into jail every weekend and paying back the victims while staying straight and earning his own money instead of having your taxes go towards his welfare cheque.

  • isaac
    April 05, 2014 - 10:07

    Maybe Sobeys, and the Needs store need a slap on the wrist for accepting counterfeit bills that were basically made in a kindergarten class! Apparently construction paper and glue comes in handy for criminals too! Lol!

  • Hale Bopp
    April 05, 2014 - 09:28

    He used the same image on both sides of the bill?? A good example of where our school system has let us down.

  • Regular Joe
    Regular Joe
    April 05, 2014 - 08:43

    I would like to see these people have to summit proof of having a job before receiving adjusted sentences . 75% or more of these people claiming to be working are not . If they were they would not be doing what they are doing .

  • Stan Hope
    April 05, 2014 - 08:31

    ... and yet another upstanding member of society , and not a very bright one at that.Bobby Bordon on both sides eh. Straighten your life out , your a failure at crime.

  • PLEASE EXPLAIN
    April 05, 2014 - 07:00

    Can someone please explain to me why it is in PEI that if you have a job you cannot go to jail Mon to Fri if convicted of a crime? There are many many people out the that follow the laws and cannot find a job yet the legal system protects convicted criminals by only making them do their sentence on weekends. PERHAPS if these criminals knew that they were going to get real punishment and GO to jail FULL TIME until their sentence is complete then some would think twice before commiting crimes. Getting these people of the streets would benefit twofold. Not only would it make the streets safer MON to FRI but would also supply much needed jobs to worthy law abiding citizens trying to get by.

    • Not hard to explain
      April 05, 2014 - 10:23

      So you'd rather them go to jail, lose their job, come out broke, then have to start stealing again?

    • huh
      April 05, 2014 - 12:21

      That's a pretty bad explanation. So if incarceration results in job loss, stealing upon release is inevitable, therefore weekend sentencing is a must? If he's a big risk to reoffend, he won't get weekend sentences. Weekend sentences reflect the overall circumstances of the person in question. The system wants him to have his life in order, get a job, and so on. If it appears the person is getting his act together, weekend sentecing is an option.

  • Tilly Shoultz
    April 05, 2014 - 01:00

    Glad to see you finally got caught stealing from hard working people Matt!!!! And even better that you are paying back the hard working people you stole from !!!