Heavy rain curbs P.E.I. shellfish harvesting

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Fishers harvest oysters from Rustico Bay

Recent heavy rainfall has led to the closure of some shellfish harvesting in Prince Edward Island.

All waters within three kilometres of the coastline, including all bays and islands from Gordon’s Point (west of the Confederation Bridge to MacIvor’s Point) are closed following a recommendation from Environment Canada.

In addition, the area from Hillsborough Bay to Point Prim remains closed to harvesting following a recommendation by Environment Canada on Sept. 11.

Heavy rainfall can contaminate shellfish and increase levels of bacterial shellfish poisoning.  

 

 

Organizations: Environment Canada

Geographic location: Prince Edward Island, Hillsborough Bay

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Recent comments

  • Waylon Wiseman
    October 08, 2012 - 15:29

    I would agree that pesticide use is undoubtedly a major concern for islanders and a major source of water contamination. However, I believe in this particular case, the contamination was not the fault of farmers. As the article mentions, bacterial shellfish poisoning is the concern driving the closure of the shellfish harvesting areas. This is likely because the infrastructure the city of Charlottetown has in place to deal with it's sewage, particularly during times of heavy rainfall, is inadequate. When rainfalls are heavy, the treatment facilities become overwhelmed. Instead of having the sewage flowing back up into our streets, the city simply opens drains, bypassing the treatment facilities, and effectively dumps raw sewage into the Hillsborough river. This results in fecal contamination, and thus bacterial contamination, of the oysters in the area. So while I agree, corporate industrial style farming practices need to be updated, this particular case is a result of poor management by the city.

  • jimmy buffet
    September 26, 2012 - 20:23

    Yes but the mussels and clams are GOOD TO GO in two weeks time.Can't wait.

  • intobed
    September 26, 2012 - 17:03

    The toxins coming from farmer's fields is getting worse every year. Farmers are killing PEI. We need a better way of farming than the current large corporate model. Corporate farmers are business owners, and only care about making more money, not about the health of the Island.

    • Seriously?
      September 26, 2012 - 21:06

      Wow, really? you're on of "those people" who blame the farmers? If it weren't for farmers, you wouldn't have food on your table! Get yours facts straight before you start blaming the farmers. Only a small percentage of the contaminants in our waterways, if any, are farm related. Theres so many other possibilities of contamination of our water. Stop blaming the farmers for everything!!!

    • mra
      mra
      September 27, 2012 - 07:24

      and how many farns are there in the city of charlottetown?

    • intobed
      September 27, 2012 - 08:22

      Seriously, I suggest you do the homework. Here is a start showing government monitoring of pesticide use: http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/eef_pestmon_eng.pdf Why does the government do such extensive monitoring? Why did they close shellfish harvesting? Dog droppings? Tsunami debris from Japan? Of course its the farmer's pesticides. Did you know that farmers on PEI use over 18 pounds of pesticides per person, compared to 3 pounds average across Canada? The way farming is done on PEI needs to change. Farmers can grow crops without having to kill PEI.