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  • Anon
    February 06, 2014 - 23:58

    Shouldn't those PD Days take plalce during the summer though? When teachers get a break that regular workers don"t? Does that not make sense, instead of taking days out of the school year to train them?

    • Anon Respond
      February 07, 2014 - 12:35

      First off: Well articulated Carmelita. Let's hope our teacher's put these extra PD days to good use and the entire Island benefits from the results of us being able to better educate and relate to our youth. Second off: Summer's off doesn't mean overpaid. PD days are not fun and games for teacher's. Children get the day off, teacher's do the same amount of work or more. It's unjust to ask anyone to start working more days without increasing their pay, and that is what you are implying as a solution. The average teacher's salary (nationwide) is $50,000. $50,000/180 days = $277.77 per day / 30 students = $9.25 / 6.5 hours = $1.42 per hour per student -- a very inexpensive baby-sitter and they even EDUCATE your kids!) Per child, we pay our teacher's less than we would pay a babysitter to watch our kids. Does that really make sense? If anything the fact that teachers get summers off should simply be seen as an opportunity for them to make more money via other means, spend more time with their children instead of other children, or as compensation for being underpaid. This math above doesn't even take into account teachers volunteering to run extra-curricular activities after school (and in the summer) for students, having to correct students work outside of school, or providing free private tutoring after or before regular school hours. Most teacher's are far from "lazy". It takes 5-6 years off post-secondary education to become a teacher. Do you remember writing that agonizing 10 page English paper or that 5 pages front and back calculus exam? Now try to imagine correcting 30 or more of them on your own time in a matter of days. Sound like your idea of fun? These people watch our children all day while we make a living so we can support them. Some people can't control their own kids, and teacher's are expected to control up to 30 children at once that come from a mix of different cultural, social, and economical backgrounds. Not only do they watch over our children, they teach and assess our children in a variety of academic, trades and social fields of study. Teaching isn't a cushy, overpaid career. Show some respect.