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Flood cat-astrophe


SYDNEY — Sydney’s recent flooding may have cost Joey the cat one of his nine lives.

Joey is normally an outdoor cat, but in the wake of recent devastating flooding in their south-end Sydney neighbourhood, his owner Lucy Wintermans opted to keep him inside for almost a week. After the worst of the flood waters in the St. Peter’s road area had subsided, Wintermans said she finally decided to let Joey outside, figuring it would be safe to do so.

“I just assumed that all the water was gone and it would be fine,” Wintermans said.

However, when he returned home, Joey was covered head to toe in furnace oil.

Joey was given about six baths with Dawn detergent — the liquid is a common tool used in cleaning animals that come into contact with oil.

“But during that time he had definitely licked himself and eaten some of it, and we didn’t really know how much he was actually into that water,” Wintermans said.

The next day, they took Joey to the veterinarian where he underwent a number of tests and it was determined that his organs were functioning mostly normally, but he was placed on antibiotics,

“He came home and he was really not himself the next day,” Wintermans said. “He still really smelled like the oil and he was walking in circles and kind of not wanting us to touch him.”

So Joey made a return trip to the vet, where he was X-rayed and spent the night on an intravenous and was bathed again. Joey has returned home on a different medication and is doing better and staring to eat normally again, but his skin is now peeling off as he sheds the layer that was in contact with the oil.

“Underneath, it’s not red or raw or anything, it’s just coming off,” Wintermans said.

The vet had determined it was mostly the ingestion and smell of the oil that was making Joey sick, and now that it is out of his system he should make a full recovery. But with the veterinarian bills now approaching $1,000, Wintermans is advising other pet owners to take particular care with their furry family members as they continue to deal with the after-effects of the Thanksgiving Day flood.

“I would like some guidance as to when it is safe for us to let animals outside because we love our cat, he’s a member of our family, our vet bills are about $1,000 so far — that’s the responsibility that comes with having a pet, but there are so many animals out there who are not going to have anybody who can take care of them,” she said.

 

Joey is normally an outdoor cat, but in the wake of recent devastating flooding in their south-end Sydney neighbourhood, his owner Lucy Wintermans opted to keep him inside for almost a week. After the worst of the flood waters in the St. Peter’s road area had subsided, Wintermans said she finally decided to let Joey outside, figuring it would be safe to do so.

“I just assumed that all the water was gone and it would be fine,” Wintermans said.

However, when he returned home, Joey was covered head to toe in furnace oil.

Joey was given about six baths with Dawn detergent — the liquid is a common tool used in cleaning animals that come into contact with oil.

“But during that time he had definitely licked himself and eaten some of it, and we didn’t really know how much he was actually into that water,” Wintermans said.

The next day, they took Joey to the veterinarian where he underwent a number of tests and it was determined that his organs were functioning mostly normally, but he was placed on antibiotics,

“He came home and he was really not himself the next day,” Wintermans said. “He still really smelled like the oil and he was walking in circles and kind of not wanting us to touch him.”

So Joey made a return trip to the vet, where he was X-rayed and spent the night on an intravenous and was bathed again. Joey has returned home on a different medication and is doing better and staring to eat normally again, but his skin is now peeling off as he sheds the layer that was in contact with the oil.

“Underneath, it’s not red or raw or anything, it’s just coming off,” Wintermans said.

The vet had determined it was mostly the ingestion and smell of the oil that was making Joey sick, and now that it is out of his system he should make a full recovery. But with the veterinarian bills now approaching $1,000, Wintermans is advising other pet owners to take particular care with their furry family members as they continue to deal with the after-effects of the Thanksgiving Day flood.

“I would like some guidance as to when it is safe for us to let animals outside because we love our cat, he’s a member of our family, our vet bills are about $1,000 so far — that’s the responsibility that comes with having a pet, but there are so many animals out there who are not going to have anybody who can take care of them,” she said.

 

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