Workshop to explore Acadian-themed cultural tourism experiences across P.E.I.

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Ideas for strengthening existing and identifying new Acadian-themed cultural tourism experiences across Prince Edward Island will be explored at a workshop scheduled for 7 p.m., Monday, Nov. 26 at the Farmer’s Bank in Rustico.

Under the co-ordination of l'Association touristique Évangéline, the workshop is designed to engage tourism operators and interested community stakeholders from across the province in an effort to heighten the appeal of Acadian heritage and modern Acadia for Islanders and visitors alike.

Traditionally considered the population base and the centre of Acadian cultural activities on P.E.I., it is known that the Evangeline region is only part of the Island Acadian story. As part of its mandate in association with the Acadian Tourism Commission of Atlantic Canada, l'Association touristique Évangéline is seeking to mine out those Island people, places and things including and beyond Evangeline, which could be enhanced and which could develop a higher profile as authentic Acadian attractions and experiences.

“The site of the workshop is an ideal example of what we’re interested in,” says association president Marcel Bernard. “The Farmer’s Bank has been carefully nurtured by community-based individuals as a leading authentic cultural tourism attraction.”

Bernard emphasized, however, that Acadian tourism is not all about bricks and mortar, but is rather about Acadia’s sense of place in the cultural mix on P.E.I.

“It is the Island Acadian experience we wish to elaborate on,” he said.

The workshop comes at a time when cultural experiences are strongly emphasized within the tourism strategies of the P.E.I. Department of Tourism and Culture, the Tourism Advisory Council of P.E.I., the Tourism Industry Association of P.E.I. and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency. Admission to the session is free, however interested parties are requested to register in advance by contacting Alcide Bernard, community tourism officer, via e-mail at regionevangeline@gmail.com or by telephone at 902-854-3409.

Organizations: Bank in Rustico, Acadian Tourism Commission of Atlantic Canada, PEI Department Tourism Advisory Council Tourism Industry Association of P.E.I. Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

Geographic location: Prince Edward Island, Acadia

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Comments

Comments

Recent comments

  • UnrulyCanuck
    January 15, 2013 - 21:08

    Forget French. The languages that we should be learning are Chinese and Korean. That's the next empire.

  • Anne Gallant
    January 03, 2013 - 02:06

    I cannot believe these awful comments. Can you not see the importance of the Acadian culture on PEI? Let us not create a divide here, we have to work together to make our province diverse and attractive to our visitors, and the Acadian culture is very attractive, as is the Micmaq culture. It it people with such negative attitudes that create problems not the ones trying to keep their culture alive!

  • don
    November 24, 2012 - 10:20

    here we go millions of our money spent on the french do they not get enough now,new class rooms. the government does as the french tells them and yet ENGLISH is most of the island. what a joke PEI is same as Ottawa bow down.i wonder how many millions will be spend on new buildings,kickbacks?

    • To Don
      November 25, 2012 - 20:18

      Don, you wrote that "millions of our money" --who do you mean by "our" money? Do not the French also pay taxes, so they too can also say it is "our" money -- and we need some of it returned now for our children because our mother tongue was quashed in elementary school in favor of English, a language of which we are also very proud.

  • cromwell
    November 20, 2012 - 08:15

    Why pander to a population that represents less than 4% of islanders, and whose loyalty appears to be with France, judging by the fact that they choose to singularly fly a modified French flag, rarely, if ever, accompanied by a Canadian or even provincial flag? France eventually lost the wars with Great Britain for Canada in 1763, at which time the French-speaking populace were offered the chance to swear allegiance to Britain, or be expelled. They chose not to change their allegiance. Note that France had earlier done the same thing to the non-French inhabitants of Newfoundland, during one of their few victories in North America, but this generally goes unreported. Surely if PEI wants to properly represent provincial history, recognize the victors, whose descendants don't fly a modified Union Jack, rather than the losers, and market the battlegrounds, in the same way that Halifax, Kingston, Quebec City , etc., do.

    • To CROM
      November 21, 2012 - 06:11

      A lot missing in your slant on things, Sir!

  • yesterday's e-mail
    November 18, 2012 - 12:08

    "….. In reading a report I just got from “Le Bourgeois” news letter I read where the Prince Eduard Island was called Ile-St, Jean in 1755 when the Dispersion took place in with some of the families from Memramcook. The English them took it over and named it PEI." Sr Louise Bourgeois, sgm, Lexington Ma